Torch Song

Broadway Previews begin Oct 9th with Michael Urie and Mercedes Ruehl. Harvey Fierstein's Torch Song. Directed by Moises Kaufman.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY & THURSDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM & 8 PM
FRIDAY @ 7:30 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

October 04, 2018 - January 06, 2019

Upcoming Scheduled Events

January 03, 2019

Running Time

2:35 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

It’s 1979 in New York City and Arnold Beckoff is on a quest for love, purpose and family. He’s fierce in drag and fearless in crisis, and he won’t stop until he achieves the life he desires.  

After a smash-hit run Off-Broadway, Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song heads to Broadway for a strictly limited engagement.

Hilarious and heart-wrenching, Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song follows Arnold Beckoff’s (Michael Urie) odyssey to find happiness in New York. All he wants is a husband, a child, and a pair of bunny slippers that fit, but a visit from his overbearing mother (Mercedes Ruehl) reminds him that he needs one thing more: respect.

An all too human journey about the families we’re born into, the families we choose, and the battles to bring them all home.

Tickets


40 Shows fit your search criteria

Standard Tickets


October 04, 2018 - January 06, 2019

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Open Captioning Tickets


January 03, 2019

Thursday @ 7:00 PM


Theatre Details

Address

Helen Hayes Theatre
240 W 44th St
New York, NY 10036

View Larger Map

Public Transportation

By Bus: M42

By Subway: 1,2,3,7,S,A,C,E,N,R,Q,W to 42nd St./Times square

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Accessible seating in both Orchestra & Mezzanine

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Seats 589.

Elevator\Escalator: Full-service/accessible elevator

Parking: Valet parking garages: 1st garage: South side of 44th St. between 6th & 7th Aves. Vertical clearance: 105". 2nd garage: East of Shubert Alley, on north side of 44th St. between Broadway & 8th Ave. No vans.

Curb Ramps: (2.5" lip) NW corner of 44th & Broadway; (2.5" lip) SE corner of 44th St. & Broadway; SW corner of 44th St. & Broadway.

Entrance: ADA-accessible building entrance at Stage Door. Handicap ramps in the lower lobby,

Box Office: Outer lobby, ground level. ADA access via the Stage Door.

Restroom: Accessible/unisex bathrooms/stalls in the lower lobby and at the mezzanine level

Water Fountain: Lower Level directly across from the elevator

Telephone: None on premises

Assisted Listening System: LOOP system in the auditorium, headsets available. Driver’s license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Not available in the first 3 rows of the Orchestra.

Reviews (3)

NYT Critic's Pick -
"Mr. Kaufman’s staging — still designed to please the eye without overwhelming it, with 1970s shorthand sets by David Zinn, costumes to match by Clint Ramos and lighting by David Lander — now feels smoother and quicker on its feet. It also feels, well, bigger." 

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

Harvey Fierstein’s “Torch Song” fires on all cylinders in this Broadway revival, opening in the same theater where it premiered 36 years ago, and it’s even bigger and better than last year’s off-Broadway production. And that’s saying something considering that I was already a big fan. But wow! It is a full throttle ode to coming out, opening up, and following one’s heart.

CONTINUE READING THE NY1 REVIEW

The first challenge in mounting a successful revival of “Torch Song,” is finding an actor who can make the role his own and escape the looming shadow of Harvey Fierstein, who originated, or rather incarnated, the role both on stage and in the 1988 film version.  The fascinating choice of Michael Urie, probably best known in the theater for his turn in “Buyer and Cellar” off-Broadway, gives the role to a chameleon actor who could not be more unlike Fierstein. Yet Urie triumphs in this play, primarily through the brilliance of his physical comedy, which adds another layer to the play’s fast and funny dialogue.

CONTINUE READING THE BROADWAY NEWS REVIEW