Network

Bryan Cranston wears a formal suit, giving the audience a stern stare.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY thru SATURDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

November 10, 2018 - April 28, 2019

Upcoming Scheduled Events

No scheduled performances found.

Running Time

2:10 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore.

Howard Beale, news anchorman, isn’t pulling in the viewers. In his final broadcast he unravels live on screen. But when the ratings soar, the network seize on their newfound populist prophet, and Howard becomes the biggest thing on TV.

Network depicts a dystopian media landscape where opinion trumps fact.

Hilarious and horrifying by turns, the iconic film by Paddy Chayefsky won four Academy Awards in 1976. Now, Lee Hall (Billy Elliot, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour) and director Ivo Van Hove (Hedda Gabler) bring his masterwork to the stage for the first time, with Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad) in the role of Howard Beale.

Tickets


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Standard Tickets


November 10, 2018 - April 28, 2019

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

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Theatre Details

Address

Belasco Theatre
111 W 44th St
New York, NY 10036

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Public Transportation

By Subway: A, C, E, N, Q, R, 1, 2, 3 To 42nd Street, walk North to 44th Street, east to theatre. Alternatively, take the B, D, or F - To 42nd Street at 6th Ave then walk North to 44th Street, west to theatre.

By Bus: Five buses stop near the Belasco Theatre. Please take the M5, M7, M20, M42, or M104

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Wheelchair seating available. Theatre is not completely wheelchair accessible. There are no steps to the designated wheelchair seating location.

Seating: Seats 1018. Orchestra has no steps. Mezzanine: Located on 2nd level, up 1 flight of stairs. Once on the Mezzanine level, there are approximately 2 steps up/down per row. Entrance to Mezzanine is behind row H. Balcony: No elevator, stairs only. Once on the Balcony level, there are approximately 2 steps up/down per row. The entrance to the Balcony is behind row F.

Elevator\Escalator: There are no elevators or escalators at this theatre.

Parking: The closest parking lot is Meyer Parking at 146 West 44th Street.

Entrance: There are two steps into the theatre from the main entrance. An alternate entrance with an accessible path of travel is located to the left of the main door.

Box Office: Lowered accessible window at the end of the box office.

Restroom: Wheelchair accessible restroom is available. Additional restrooms are also located down one flight of stairs, and on the mezzanine and balcony levels.

Water Fountain: A water fountain is available in the main lobby.

Telephone: A pay phone is located in the theatre lobby. Accessible at 54"

Assisted Listening System: Reservations are not necessary. Drivers license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Please call: (212) 582-7678 to reserve in advance.

Folding Armrests: There are four (4) seats with folding armrests in this theatre.

Reviews (3)

Perhaps the key factor drawing sellout crowds, in something of an irony given the material’s finger-wagging, TV-will-kill-you moral, is the man playing Beale, Bryan Cranston, from television’s “Breaking Bad.” He gives a ferocious, larger-than-life performance (literally, given the giant screen on which his life-weathered face often appears) in the role of Beale, whose on-air meltdown — culminating in the exhortation to his viewers to open their windows and rage that they are “mad as hell” and are not going to take it anymore — is one of the most famous sequences in 1970s film.

CONTINUE READING THE BROADWAY NEWS REVIEW

NYT Critic's Pick 

Mr. Cranston, as befits someone portraying an unbiddable maverick, tears through the formulas of Lee Hall’s Chayefsky-honoring script to create a raging, bleeding portrait of a man who is a creature and a captive of a satanic medium

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

Say what you want about the power of live performance, audiences will inevitably gravitate to the big jumbotron image over the real and tiny thing every time. Van Hove’s direction, Jan Versweyveld’s lighting and sets, and Tal Yarden’s videos not only acknowledge that audience preference, they turn it into an addiction and make it central to what this “Network” is all about.

CONTINUE READING THE WRAP REVIEW